lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
January:
Short Fiction: Seanan McGuire's Snake in the Glass, Ursula Vernon's Razorback and Jim C. Hines' Chupacabra's Song

New Reads:
Robert Jackson Bennett's City of Stairs
Josh Fruhlinger's The Enthusiast
(editors) John Joseph Adams & Hugh Howey's the End Has Come:  Third in a triptych of apocalypse-themed short fiction anthologies.  The last focused on post-apoc survival and rebuilding.
Ilona Andrews' Magic Stars: A "Kate Daniels" series novella focused on Derek and Julie.
Tanya Huff's Third Time Lucky: Collection of short comic works about an immortal wizard.
Lexie Dunne's Superheroes Anonymous & Supervillains Anonymous: Gail is nicknamed "Hostage Girl" because villains think she's super-hero Blaze's girlfriend.  And then we he leaves town she ends up getting super-powers herself.
Michelle West's The Broken Crown
Andre Norton's Tales From the High Hallack vol.1: Collection of "Witch World" short stories.
Delilah Dawson/Kevin Hearne/Chuck Wendig's Three Slices:  A short story from each writer's setting.  All with a cheese divination theme.
Kevin Hearne's Staked: Latest "Iron Druid" book with, shockingly, many vampire opponents.

Rereads: None

Graphic Novels/TPBs:
Garth Ennis/Jonh Mcrea's The Demon: Hell's Hitman

Total: 13

Febuary:
Short Fiction:  Django Wexler's the Shadow of Elysium, Delia Sherman's the Great Detective, Joe Abercrombie's Two's Company, Seanan McGuire's Velveteen Presents: Action Dude Vs. Doing the Right Thing and Brian McCellan's Ghosts of the Tristan Basin

New Reads:
C.E. Murphy's Baba Yaga's Daughter the Tales of the Old Races:  World building short fiction for Murphy's "Old Races/Negotiatior" series.
N.K. Jemison's the Fifth Season:  Excellent read, even if the flash-back part of the story somewhat overwhelms the "now" bits.
Daniel Polansky's the Builders:  Like if Sam Peckinpah directed a "Redwall" movie.
Peter Clines' Ex-Isle:  Supers vs. zombies AT SEA.
Nicola Griffith's Hild:  Iron age Britain historical fiction yumminess.
Greg Van Eekhout's Dragon Coast:  One more crazy heist, one more group of nasty cannibal wizards.
Michael McCloskey's Trilisk Supersedure
T. Kingfisher's the Raven & the Reindeer: Ursula Vernon's Snow Queen adaptation.
Daniel O'Malley's the Rook:  What if you woke up with no memories of your life but were told you were one of the leaders of England's super-powered, super-secret spy orginization.  Oh and some of your co-workers wanted to kill you for what you used to know.
(editor) Eric Flint's Ring of Fire IV:  Most recent pro-anthology for the "Ring of Fire" series.
Georgette Heyer's the Quiet Gentleman:  I've liked other Regency Romance style books, but this one didn't really work for me.
Sherwood Smith's Whispered Magics:  Collection of Smith's short fiction.
Joe Haldeman's All My Sins Remembered:  Such a depressing ending.  Soooo bleak.

Rereads: None

Graphic Novels/TPBs:
G. Willow Wilson/Adrian Alphona/Dan Slott/Christos Gage/Guiseppe Camuncoli's Ms. Marvel: Last Days vol. 4:  Short arc leading into whatever last year's summer crossover event was, with some Spider-Man team-up filler.
Joe Hill/Gabriel Rodriguez' Locke & Key: Alpha & Omega:  Used part of the tax refund to finally finish up the series.
Stjepan Šejić's Sunstone vol.4:  Argh!  Open lines of communication people!
Joe Casey/Nick Dragotta/Brad Simpson's Vengeance:  Better than average Marvel mini-series that got lost in the Big Events.

Total: 19

March:
Short Fiction:  Seanan McGuire's Swamp Bromeliad & Velveteen Vs. the Consequences of Her Actions, Alyssa Wong's a Fist of Permutations in Lightning & Wildflowers, Melissa Marr's the Maiden Thief, Carrie Vaughn's That Game We Played in War Time, Caighlan Smith's the Weather, Dave Freer's the Changeling & the Phooka and David D. Levine's Discards.

New Reads:
Stephen Leather's Once Bitten:  Meh vampire fic.
Seanan McGuire's Chaos Choreography:  Latest "InCryptid" novel, going back to Verity Price and a reality dance show reuinion.
R.J. Ross' Shadow Boy:  Most recent "Cape High" book that wraps up the Evil Presidential Canidate arc.
(editors) Walt Boyes/Bjorn Hasseler's Grantville Gazette vol.62-64
Ken Liu's Grace of Kings.  The rise from peasant gangster to Emperor.
Orest Stelmuch's the Boy From Reactor 4:  Ukrainian and Russian gangsters, Chernobyl and hockey.
George R.R. Martin's A Knight the 7 Kingdoms:  Collection of the Duncan & Egg/Hedge Knight stories.
Tamora Pierce's Magic Steps, Street Magic, Cold Fire, Shatterglass, the Will of the Empress & Melting Stones.  Bingeing on nearly all the remaining "Circle of Magic"
(editors) Will Shetterly/Emma Bull's Liakek 1:  First in a shared-world anthology series.
Joe K. Lansdale's Savage Season.  Stupid Sundance preview week making me think I could record all of Hap & Leonard so I had to read the book instead.  Good book though.
Jeff Vandameer's Annihilation, Authority and Acceptance:  I heard there was a television adaptation for this trilogy in the works.  If they get it right it will be super-creepy and amazing.
K.J. Parker's Downfall of the Gods.  One goddess' long scam against her pantheon, though I'm unclear as to her motivation.

Rereads: None

Graphic Novels/TPBs:
Shannon, Dean & Nathan Hale's Calamity Jack:  Steampunk/fairy tale mash-up sequel to Rapunzel's Revenge
Ananth Hirsh/Yuko Ota's Lucky Penny

Total: 22

3 Movies

Oct. 28th, 2014 10:37 pm
lurkerwithout: (eastman)
Bad Words: Jason Bateman's movie about an adult who uses a loophole to get into the National Spelling Bee competition for reasons.  Which  wobbles all over the place between treating its characters as sociopaths or woobies in need of a hug.  Some funny scenes but honestly adult who plays cruel head games with children doesn't work for me...

Only Lovers Left Alive: Jim Jarmusch directs Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton as melancholy vampires was a very easy sell.  Slow-paced but clever.  Doesn't try to reinvent the cinematic vampire concept and doesn't need to...

Detention of the Dead: On the other hand this last movie probably could have done with ditching of its sub-genres cliches.  Or at least done a better job of lampshading them...
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
And another year of just getting these under the wire of my own self-imposed time limit.  First finished book of the year was Kate Elliott's Cold Steel, which finished up her alt history/fantasy "Cold Magic" trilogy.  With gods and ghouls and dragons and rebellions...

Did a reread of Snuff after picking up a cheap e-copy.  Still fun but definitely the weakest of the "Vimes/Watch" books of Pratchett's Discworld...

Another new Grantville Gazette e-book, with volume 51 still edited by Paula Goodlett.  And the current cycle of stories continues to really catch hold of me.  I mean I like the polygamous German noble and his family and friends, but not where I want the stories collected or to have full length books like I did with the Sewing Circle/Barbie Consortium, Musicians or Russians...

Then got into a new supers writer, Kevin Hardman.  Sensation introduces his teen hero (from another highly regulated supers setting) Kid Sensation who is trying to have a second attempt at joining the high school hero community.  After a disaster of a first go.  Mutation has Kid Sensation at the supers high school in its own pocket dimension.  And Infiltration has him going undercover with a new super-villain mob.  Enjoyable, but the writer is constantly having to handicap his lead after loading him down with half the super-powers out there...

Six-Gun Snow White is a Western revamp of the classic fairy tale by Catherynne M. Valente.  Full of Valente's rich, evocative descriptions and vibrant setting and heart-breaking characters...

The John Joseph Adams & Douglas Cohen edited Reimagined Oz is a strong collection of new takes on the Oz setting.  I'm glad I'd read more of the original Oz series before though.  Also a lot of dystopian Oz stories in the collection...

Finally got around to On Stranger Tides the Tim Powers novel they loosely adapted into both the first and fourth Pirates of the Caribbean movies.  Great stuff for those wanting pirates and magic and revenge and Blackbeard and sword fights and such...

Francessco Marciuliano's two collections of poetry written by pets, I Could Pee on This and I Could Chew on This are quick, little fun books.  Like poem versions of those voiced-over cat or dog YouTube videos...

A new "Ex" supers vs. zombies book from Peter Clines, Ex-Communication with the heroes of the previous volumes living in a world with neither supers or zombies...

After the disappointing sort of Twin Peaks/Prisoner book from Blake Crouch I was much happier with Sunset Key.  A very noir-ish about a ex-junkie thief who gets hired to seduce and rob a wealthy investment banker type on his private island before he goes to federal prison...

I honestly don't know what prompted me to get the e-book of Tales From the Cobra Wars, a G.I. Joe anthology edited by Max Brooks.  Some of the stories were dumb, some were interesting  and all leave you frustrated with how in a military/espionage series the main terrorist bad guys are uncatchable or kill-able.  Still the bonus story at the end with the Joe's PTSD therapist almost makes it worth the 4 or 5 bucks I probably paid for the book...

You know what is disappointing about Karin Lowachee's Gaslight Dogs?  Not the alt earth/fantasy setting.  Or the characters.  Or the magic.  Or the mysterious church gunslingers hinted at.  No, its that apparently the book wasn't popular enough that the writer thinks she'll ever go back to the series to put out a second book...

Cauldron of Ghosts is the soon to be latest of the Eric Flint/David Weber "Honorverse" books from the super-spy section of that setting.  Good if you're a fan of the series, definitely not the book to introduce or win back someone who isn't though...

Countdown City is Ben H. Winter's sequel to his Last Policeman.  In this one Hank Palace agrees to try and find a missing husband even though he's no longer a cop and the world is set for an apocalyptic asteroid collision in 74 days...

Seanan McGuire into the modern fairy tale style of urban fantasy with Indexing, about a government agency of people afflicted with storybook lives who try to keep the rest of the world safe from same.  Secretly.  My favorite throwaway line was probably how the agency made sure to never make a payday error for the young woman who was Indexed as a Pied Piper...

Chuck Wendig's Under the Empyrean Sky is a dystopian future, where America is a blighted wasteland covered in mutated corn.  With various villages eking out an existence while being overlorded by flying city people...

Mike Shevdon's latest "Feyre" novel the Eighth Court ends up being a Break the Board and Restart the Game kind of book...

And ended the month with Jasper Fforde's the Song of the Quarkbeast, a sequel to his Last Dragonslayer YA book.  Offbeat and very Jasper Ffordery...

Also in January the usual collection of of uncollected short fiction.  Extraction is Kid Sensation story from Hardman, with his lead and friends rescuing some kids from a super-secret government facility.  And Jessica Brody's the Intelligence Director is a similar story, but feels more like the opening chapter to full-length book.  Which always annoys me with a short story.  The Pain of Others by Blake Crouch is a prequel to previously mentioned Sunset Key, with a murder-for-hire story where the actual bad guy changes up during the story.  Ken Liu's Reborn is post-alien invasion story of the benevolent conqueror style.  And the Cartography of Sudden Death by Charlie Jane Anders is future setting time travel adventure...

Total: 21
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
Time to get the final list for '13 done.  Starting with the free range short fiction.  John Scalzi gives a tale of obsession and science with Muse of Fire.  Mari Ness' In the Greenwood gives a new slant on the Sherwood myth.  Hope's End and the Girl of Hrusch Avenue are a pair of "Gunpowder Magic" stories by Brian McClellan (read to wait for the arrival of the 2nd book in that series).  The Christmas Show by Pat Cadigan is probably the most upbeat of the seasonal short stories, despite the ghosts and unexpected death.  Though for a "Laundry Files" story Charles Stross' Overtime manages a bit of cheer amidst the forebodings of world destroying doom.  Jim Hines gives a bloody and grim follow up to all those Rankin-Bass specials with Crimson Frost.  Then Sean McGuire's Velveteen vs. Hypothermia checks in with her titular super-hero as she begins her time paying back the Holidays for their help.  And finally a non-seasonal piece from Neil Gaiman gives an almost whimsical Cthulu mythos tale with I, Cthulu...

Started the month by finally getting to Brian McClellan's Promise of Blood the first of his "Gunpowder Magic" novels.  A grim look at overthrowing monarchies and ignoring old prophecies.  But gripping and I'm impatiently awaiting the next book's release...

Then got around to catching up on C.E. Murphy's "Urban Shaman" series.  Spirit Dance has mechanic-turned cop-turned shaman Walker gets a magical night out seeing a dance troupe that gets weird even by her standards.  And then involves murder and a possible werewolf.  Then in Raven Calls its back to Ireland and her dead mom plus time travel and the Celtic pantheon.  No Dominion is a short story collection, concentrating on various side characters throughout the series.  And then the latest, Mountain Echoes, with Walker going back to her "home" on the Rez to help in the search for missing father, ex-boyfriend and the son she gave up as a teenager...

Janet Evanovich's latest "Stephanie Plum" book, Takedown Twenty, is a stronger entry than the previous in this sereis, though its still one of the weaker books.  Even with a giraffe running around in it...

Exodus Towers and the Plague Forge complete Jason M. Hough's "Dire Earth Cycle" trilogy.  With several game changing alien mysteries, regime changes, Immune raiders and final reveal of Why for the alien motivations that makes a certain amount of sense and draws things to a close while leaving a window open for follow up stories...

Two more "Oz" stories by Baum and adapted by Shanowar and Young with Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz and the Road to Oz.  The first has Dorothy reuniting with the Wizard to take a journey thru neighboring fairy lands to return to Oz thanks to an earthquake during a trip to California. The latter has Dorothy and Toto making another return trip, this time alongside magical hobo the Shaggy Man...

The first of Debra Doyle and James McDonald's "MageWorld" books, the Price of the Stars, read kind of like an adaptation of Star Wars if someone had only gotten a synopsis of the original poster art after being translated thru several languages.  Luckily that ends up being pretty great space opera and hopefully the rest of the series is as enjoyable...

The Kerrie L. Hughes edited Hex in the CIty is part of the "Fiction River" e-anthology line.  With an InCryptid tale from Seanan McGuire, as well as Jay Lake, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Nancy Holder and others...

C.M. Priest finishes up her "Clockwork Century" series with Fiddlehead.  Where a ramshackle A.I's predictions may lead to peace between the Union and Confederacy if it isn't derailed by war profiteers.  And if it isn't all too late in the growing menace of the shambling undead...

And I finished the month with the disappointing Pines by Blake Crouch.  A bit Twin Peaks, a bit of the Prisoner and maybe even some Bioshock.  Which may be the perfect mash-up for someone else.  Me I found the science dumb, the reveal aggravating and the epilogue frustrating.  My Crouch book, Run, was good enough that I'm going to try one of his other series a chance.  But I'm done with this one...

Total books: 15
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
Looking over my November list I'm only seeing four free-range short stories.  Andy Merino's grotesque transformation story of a pioneer journey in the Oregon Trail Diary of Willa Porter.  Then Benjamin Rosenbaum's bureaucracy and social media during the zombie apocalypse in Feature Development for Social Networking.  Su Yee Lin has a dreamscape style quest in 13 Steps in the Underworld.  And finally Michael Swanwick has another of his "Mongolian Wizard" stories set in a fantasy alternate history World War with House of Dreams...

Actually started the month with Paolo Bacigalupi's YA zombies & the meat packing industry book, Zombie Baseball Beatdown.  Followed by volume 50 of the Grantville Gazette (edited by Paula Godlett) one of the less memorable and slight collections.  I honestly had to go back and look to remember any of the stories in it...

Veteran mystery writer Janet Evanovich teams with long time tv and novel mystery writer Lee Goldberg with the Heist.  The pair craft a competent and entertaing (if overused concept) cop and crook team up to take down a bigger Bad...

American Elsewhere by Robert Jackson Bennett is creepy and gripping mix of small town Americana, Cthulhu-style alien entities and dysfunctional families...

Another entry in Baen's "Ring of Fire" e-books, 1635: Music & Murder by David Carrico collects the various Gazette stories that lead into 1636: the Devil's Opera.  I do like the "modern" music influencing the downtime art forms stories, so it was nice to have them collected in one spot...

Gail Carriger's "Finishing School" was a new one for me.  The two books in the series so far, Etiquette & Espionage and Courtesies & Conspiracies combine Victorian-era steampunk, vampires, werewolves, espionage and girl's finishing schools...

Finally got around to Suzanne Collin' 'pre-"Hunger Games" book Gregor the Overlander.  Turns out its the start of a kidlet series, of the hidden magical world stumbled into by a "normal" hero.  I will give Collins this, she had me crying over the heroic death of giant cockroach.  And roaches freak me the fuck out, so high bar there...

I was less than impressed with the pair of horror novels by Joey Compeau.  One Bloody Thing After Another feels unfinished, like it ends about 3/4 of the way thru the story.  And I could not bring myself to wade thru the wholesale slaughter and murder of kids with the Summer is Ended & We are Not Saved...

I was happily surprised by Drew Hayes' Super Powereds and Super Powereds 2.  He writes the books one chapter at a time and posts them on his site, then publishes the whole thing when they're done.  I've been avoiding checking the individual chapers for volume 3 as I want to read it as a whole.  But you can actually see his writing craft improve chapter by chapter.  I'll also admit I picked up the first one hoping it was by the still-missed late Drew Hayes of Poison Elves.  Sadly, no...

Sharon Lee and Steve Miller's latest "Liaden" book, Trade Secret, took me a few chapters to get hooked into.  Mostly trying to recall which sub-story line and short fiction it was mainly connect into...

Sharpe's Prey by Bernard Cornwell takes place in 1807 and Denmark, in between the India and Spain campaigns for Wellington and Sharpe.  Not one of the most memorable in the series, but picking it up filled one of the holes in my collection of the series...

I've been mixing together reading the Frank L. Baum "Oz" series after getting a complete omnibus e-edition and picking up the recent Marvel comics' adaptations by Eric Shanowar and Skottie Young.  For November I read the Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the Marvelous Land of Oz and Ozma of Oz.  The expanded Oz setting is a trip and a half...

The Way We Fall by Megan Crewe is another YA/End of Civilization book.  Its also a touching, melancholy and yet hopeful book.  Crewe's makes a great choice in focusing on a small isolated coastal island struggling with the civilization-breaking plague outbreak.  I need to get the sequel sometime soon...

Beta read another book for my friend Joe Selby.  Family Jewels is a future scifi/noir mash-up with detectives and teleportation and planets owned by decendents of todays mega-wealthy and a jewel heist.  I had a few quibbles with some parts of the set-up, but as always I wish Joe had a publisher so more people could get a chance to read his work...

You're Jonah Yu is a Choose Your Own Adventure book by Jeffrey C. Wells, that ties into his and Shaennon K. Garrity's webcomic Skin Horse...

And finally, ended the month with a reread of Lois McMaster Bujold's Captain Vorpatrill's Alliance.  I just really like this and a Civil Campaign and just can't get enough of either...

Total: 21
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
Started off July with Faerie After, the finale to Janni Lee Simner's post-WW3 vs. the elves trilogy. Much of the book deals with learning to move past grief and loss...

After that was Kurt Vonnegut's Mother Night, probably my favorite of his adapted movies, even if this was my first time reading the actual story. One of his best I think...

Got the e-arc of the next "Ring of Fire" book, 1636: the Devil's Opera by Eric Flint and David Carrico. It meshes together several of the ongoing series from the anthologies, the Madeburg Musicians and Madeburg PD. Plus its set during the end part of "Saxon Uprising", which all together gives it a bit of a smooshed together feeling, like the individual pieces weren't enough to hold together a story on their own. Plus I like the original "Symphony For the Devil" title better...

Then the newest Garrett book from Glen Cook, Wicked Bronze Ambition. Which has Garrett dealing with his future in-laws and all their friends. Who are all basically upper class, crazy wizards. I enjoyed seeing that Cook was continuing the Morley Dotes/Belinda Contague relationship as well, though not making it easy for the pair...

I actually thought Sherwood Smith's Banner of the Damned was going to be a prequel to her "Inda" series. Instead its set several centuries after those books...

Ex-Communication is the 3rd in Peter Clines' supers vs. zombies series. This time around the Hollywood survivor community is introduced to an additional supernatural threat. And a new kind of zombie in the form of a strange teenage girl...

Also finally got around to reading the first of Lois McMaster Bujold's "Chalion" books, Curse of Chalion. Which meant, of course, then rereading Paladin of Souls and the Hallowed Hunt...

Constellations is the first collection of "Liaden" short fiction by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. I'd read a few of their short pieces but they're scattered all over and there are like a bazillion of them. So this reprint series definitely makes me happy...

Steven Gould's Impulse is the third book in his "Jumper" series. It follows the daughter of the lead characters from the previous two books as she both develops her own teleportation abilities and enters public school for the first time. While I didn't like it as much as Jumper it was a definite improvement over the 2nd book, Reflex...

I picked up the Monster's Corner an anthology of semi-horror edited by Christopher Golden on the cheap somewhere. It only had a few clunkers in it, but also not many memorable or outstanding pieces...

Neal Asher's the Deperature is a near future dystopia/space exploitation book. Parts of it made me wonder if it is meant as a prequel to his "Polity" series. Which I'll probably get a better idea of once I pick up the next two books in the trilogy...

Finished out July rereading David Weber's "Safehold" series, getting to Off Armageddon Reef, By Schism Rent Asunder, By Heresies Distressed and a Mighty Fortress. All of which leaves me impatiently waiting until next February for the next book...

On the free range short fiction, only three for July. Susan Palwick's "Homecoming" is a girl goes to sea disguised as a boy story. Nathan Ballingrud's "the Monsters of Heaven" is a sad story of loss and angels. Well, sort of angels. And Jeffrey Ford's "Rocket Ship to Hell" a bar story about a private enterprise attempt at a spacecraft crewed by artists...
Total Books: 17
lurkerwithout: (eastman)
Whelp, that was a passable Brad Pitt vs. monsters action movie.  What it isn't in any but the most superficial way is an adaptation of the book.  They've still got a brief bit about Israel's 10th Man.  And people living on boats.  And while there is a Nova Scotian refugee camp there is no mention of people have to resort to cannibalism.  I wouldn't go so far as to actually recommend spending money on it, but its an ok way to pass just under two hours...
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
So more than a bit late on this one.  Ah well.  Starting out with the uncollected short stories for the month.  Seanan McGuire's Emeralds to Emeralds, Dust to Dust is part of a series of e-stories re-imagining the Oz setting.  Hers is a noir-ish murder mystery where political agitator and some-time diplomat Dorothy Gale is tasked with solving a murder by her ex, Ozma.  The was Weston Ochse's Border Dogs, part of his Seal Team 666 series, about chupacabres, drug cartels and coyotes.  The people smugglers not the wild canines.  Liked this one I eventually got around to picking up the book.  Then we've got a Hemingway homage by Harry Turtledove, Running of the Bulls.  Might have more to comment on that one if I'd ever been into Hemingway.  And finally a steampunk Western, Terrain, by Genevieve Valentine.  Which just serves as another reminder that I should try and track down some of her full length work...

A big portion of March's books come from me deciding to pick up a giant stack of Lone Wolf books.  Like a lot of D&D nerds I was big into Joe Dover's & Gary Chalk's choose-your-own-adventure series as a kid.  Books are still pretty good and tempt me towards seeing if I could get a group together to run the rpg version.  Anyway, re-played Flight from the Dark, Fire on the Water, the Caverns of Kalte, the Chasm of Doom, Shadow on the Sand (which covers the regular Kai books), Kingdom of Terror,Castle Death and Jungle of Death (starting the MagnaKai books)...

Malindo Lo's Huntress is a fairy tale style fantasy, serving as a prequel to her Ash book...

On the collected short story side, had several anthologies for March.  Grantville Gazette vol. 46, edited by Paul Goodlett, continuing the e-collections for the Ring of Fire series.Tales of the Far West, edited by Gareth-Michael Skarka is a collection of Wuxia/Western mash-ups.  The quality of the stories in the Mad Scienctist's Guide to World Domination will likely vary on how tolerant you towards various level of bad guys win type stories.  But its got a good selection of writers.  Austin Grossman, Seanan McGuire and DIana Gabaldon among others.  All editied by John Joseph Adams.  And I finally got around to finishing up Vol. 29 of the Year's Best Science Fiction.  This was the 2011 edition, edited as always by Gardner Dozois.  Literally took me a year to get thru this, despite the very high quality of the contents...

Midnight Bluelight Special is the second in McGuire's Incryptid novels.with Verity Price, ballroom dancer and cryptonaturalist and her ex-Covenant boyfriend having to deal with a Covenant team.  One of whom is family...

Patricia Brigg's latest Mercy Thompson book is Frost Burned.  Picking up where her last Alpha/Omega left off, a rogue group has kidnapped Mercy's husband and nearly all of his werewolf pack.  Plus some Fae assassins...

The Last Policeman by Ben H. Winters starts with a pretty great high concept.  A cop looking to solve a murder when the whole world is under a death countdown from a closing asteroid.  Happily its a well written book on top of that...

The Cold Commands is the second of Richard Morgan's grimdark fantasy books.  More brutal violence and terrible good guys fighting worse bad guys...

Jay Lake's Green is an excellent fantasy series.  One with a nice off-brand setting, magic-system and mythology.  Also an intriguing  and entrancing lead in the much-piled-upon Green...

Carrie Vaughn's  Kitty Rocks the House is the latest in her Kitty Norville books.  With werewolf radio host Kitty having to deal with a power grab by an outsider in her pack.  And vampiric ally and Master of Denver, Rick, being tempted away by a secret order of Catholic vampires...

Michael Brandman was one of the co-writers on the Jesse Stone tv series.  Which explains why he was picked to continue the late Robert Parker's books.  At least the Jesse Stone ones.  And he does an..adequate job of it with Killing the Blues.  Not enough to get me to continue with non-Parker Robert Parker, but ok...

And lastly Joe Schrieber's Red Harvest another of his Star Wars + Zombies books.  This one set at a Sith academy during the Old Republic era...

Total Books: 22
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
I always expect to read a lot more on my birthday vacation, and yet I don't.  *shrug*

Started out the month with another of Mike Shephard's "Kris Longknife" books, Intrepid.  Later on I finished the remaining three, Undaunted, Redoubtable and Daring.  Sadly by book nine I had grown weary of Kris, her band of snarky sidekicks and the yo-yoing level of "science" available...

Got the latest "Liaden" book from Sharon Lee and Steven Miller, Necessity's Child.  This entry mostly pushes the regular character's into the background while focusing on one of the younger House Korval members.  As well as a far future version of what seems to be Roma...

During the vacation I did get to the stack of "Walt Longmire" by Craig Johnson books the roommate got me at Christmas.  I read the 1st one a  while back after getting an e-version on sale, so this was the next three.  The books, Kindness Goes Unpunished, Another Man's Moccasins, and Death Without Company, are a step above the tv adaptation (which isn't too shabby on its own) though Henry Standing Bear's voice is very much that of Lou Diamond Phillips during the reading...

I'd had Isaac Marion's zomromcom Warm Bodies for awhile, but I didn't really get inspired to finish it off until catching the movie version.  The zombies in the book have more of a weird culture than the movies.  With the skeletal skinless zombies being a kind of priest/teacher caste.  Plus the zombies eat people a bit longer than they do in the movie...

Jasper Fforde starts up yet another series with the Last Dragonslayer.  Though this modern fantasy is aimed at a YA audience.  And could work as a one-off.  But I wouldn't seeing more of his wizardry run by bureaucracy again...

Also finally got to the next two books of Alan Dean Foster's "Tipping Point" cyberpunk trilogy.  While the final bad reveal was a bit of a let-down, it was more than made up for by watching the super-assassin chasing the heroes get an ass-kicking from a giant ground sloth in the second book, Body, Inc.  And the deadly engineered family of meerkats in the Sum of Her Parts...

Peter Brett's latest "Demon Cycle" book, the Daylight War, dropped in February as well.  Which in addition large sections devoted to one character's back-story (which served to make them a great deal more sympathetic) has the confrontation between the Warded Man and the Spear of the Desert...

After sitting thru much of the recent movie version, decided to get around to Jules Verne's Mysterious Island.  Which needed more giant animals.  And I kind of felt the survivor group went from almost zero resources to being able to make flintlock weapons a bit too easily...

I mostly picked up the Myth Interpretations collection by the late Robert Asprin to get a copy of his "Cold Cash War".  Though it also has some amusing Skeeve and company stories...

And finally was a new-ish Steve Hamiltion "Alex McKnight" book, Misery Bay.  With Alex agreeing to look into the suicide of U.S. Marshall's son.  Which leads to a revenge-based cinema verte killer...

Total Books: 16

Warm Bodies

Feb. 6th, 2013 10:18 pm
lurkerwithout: (eastman)
The best description I can think of for this is..surprisingly cute. The movie version cuts out the odd zombie society/culture stuff. And downplays the whole zombies must feed on the living aspect a bit. And much of the humor comes from the incogruity of R's inner monologue vs. the external situation. But yeah, a cute and charming ZomRomCom...
lurkerwithout: (Hobbes)
Happy birthday to the Disney-bound [livejournal.com profile] seanan_mcguire. Hrm, I wonder if anyone has done Zombie Rising at giant theme park. Post-apocalypse yes, but during?
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
Lets squeeze the August list in just under the wire. Again. Starting with Ben Aaronovitch's newest "Rivers of London" book Whispers Underground. I do so enjoy this sereies with its mix of humour, police procedural and urban fantasy. This time around the copper/wizards are investigating the murder of a U.S. Senator's son in the London Underground...

The second scifi book by Michael McCloskey, Trilisk AI, is still pretty good. Though not without some annoying flaws. He uses the "characters training for a mission in VR" a bit too much. And what should be a major part of the end climax happens basically off-screen...

Three Jim Hines books in August. First a collection of his short stories, Kitemaster & Other Stories. The titular story, with pseudo-Chinese air elemental wizards with kite familiars was especially good. Then one of his earliest books, Goldfish Dreams which draws from Hines work with teens, is a non-fantasy story about a college freshman dealing with the sexual abuse she suffered from her older brother as a child. Along with the regular life-changes of living away from home for the first time. And finally Libriomancer, Hines' new urban fantasy about wizards who withdraw pretty much anything from books...

After the roommate introduced me to Ilona Andrews and their "Kate Daniels" books I then ended up grabbing the three books from their "Edge" series; On the Edge, Bayou Moon and Fate's Edge. Where the setting has the mundane world, the magic world and a mixed-world between the two. After the first book, each books seems to have a secondary male character from the previous book acting as joint protagonist and romantic interest for a new female protagonist. A little bit formulaic, but still fun and I'm interested to see if the basic trend continues with the next book drops in November. Also from the Andrews' in August was the most recent "Kate Daniels" Gunmetal Magic. Though its actually about Kate's best friend and partner Andrea Nash, werehyena gun-bunny. She and her ex-boyfriend have to work together investigating multiple murders at a reclamation site that leads to a war between ancient gods...

Courier Ryb by Sharon Lee & Steve Miller, is a pair of short stories for their Liaden scifi setting. Though the second short adds more to the setting, I'd say I liked the titular first story a bit more...

I forget whose short story was the reason I picked up Westward Weird, edited by Martin Greenberg and Kerrie Hughes, but its a good collection. With various Western steampunk/fantasy/zombie mash-ups...

Noah Chinn is a long-time internet friend, from way back in time to my Kenzerco Forum days. So I was more than willing to grab his two e-books just for that. And happily both are pretty darn good. Trooper #4 is what seems to be an actual original twist on the zombie apocalypse sub-genre. And Bleedig Heart Yard manages that perfect balancing act for an urban fantasy between horror and humour...

Col Buchanan's Farlander is a more than competently written and put together series. And its story about a prince of an evil empire marked for death by religious assassins after killing a woman under their protection is interesting enough. But the theocratic evil empire is a bit too Chaotic Evil super-crazy and super-evil for me to buy that they would become a world conquering threat...

Another anthology, this time Tanya Huff's February Thaw. Several good stories here, including a "Victoria Nelson"/"Smoke and" tie-in tale...

Got around to the Mira Grant prequel novella Countdown. Which follows the start of her zombie "Newsflesh" series. And for the simple phrase "goggie" Sean McGuire will pay. And not because it made me cry. Which it didn't. At all. And no one can prove otherwise...

And in between all this new book reading, took a pause to reread Martin Millar's Curse of the Wolf Girl. Because I can always use some werewolf and fire elemental family drama. Plus I always want to give super-emo, super-deadly Kalix MacRinnalch a hug. A very careful hug...

the Way to Glory is David Drake's 4th "Lt. Leary" book. Good stuff for those looking for "Master & Commander" in space...

With Labyrinth, I finally get back to Kat Richardson, with 5th book in her "Greywalker" books. Lead Harper Blaine is back from London and has to scramble to protect her friends from being caught between warring vampires. With both sides looking to make use of her ghost-world influencing powers...

Mur Lafferty's Playing for Keeps isn't the best supers book. Its probably not even in my top twenty. To be fair I've been reading a LOT of prose supers lately. But her story about 2nd-rate supers banding together against crazy super-villains and corrupt "heroes" is still pretty enjoyable and her good guys are more than likeable...

Paolo Bacigalupi's fantasy novella the Alchmemist is a nice break from his usual dystopian future. Not that there isn't plenty of dystopia in his setting where using magic now accelerates the growth of a kind of poisonous, thorny kudzu plant...

I don't know what it was about Claire DeWitt & the City of the Dead by Sara Gran that made me put it down after only a half-dozen chapters. Maybe it was the overly detached and generally unpleasant lead...

On the other hand Kate Elliot's latest fantasy false-history "Spiritwalker" series is easily my new favorite thing from her. I just devoured the first two books, Cold Magic and Cold Fire and am eagerly awaiting the third sometime next year...

From that lots of supers pile, next up is James Maxey's Nobody Gets the Girl. The lead, Richard Rogers, is someone who has become nearly totally unnoticeable, after a time travel incident mostly writes him out of existence. Which makes him an ideal agent for heroic super-scientist Dr. Know...

Lee Goldberg is a television and print mystery writer with a large back list. His King City was an impulse buy from a Daily Deal offer. And its a pretty good book, about a too ethical for his own good cop who gets assigned to the city's worst section with little to no back-up after taking down his own squad for being corrupt. Though I think the end is a bit rushed as Goldberg hurries to tie up several different plot threads...

Hugh Howey's Wool is a very interesting take on a post-apocalyptic setting. With several mysteries, power-mad bad guys and even some romance...

Barbara Hambly's the Time of the Dark is a nice variant on the "real" Earth people drawn into magical world trope. While I do wonder if maybe her two "regular" heroes adapt a little fast to their new setting I did like it enough that at some point I'll grab the next book in the series...

Saladin Ahmed's Throne of the Crescent Moon is a finely-crafted, stand-alone fantasy. But one that could easily be the set-up for a larger series. Plus its always good to get a fantasy series that doesn't draw at all from a Euro-centric background...

And finally for the month Maps & Legends a collection of essays by Michael Chabon on storytelling, history and religion...

Total books: 30
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
Once again just getting the last month done before the current one ends. Starting off with the Kevin Anderson edited Blood Lite III: Aftertaste urban fantasy anthology. Which was pretty lackluster overall. Even old favorites like Jim Butcher have fairly weak offerings in this one. In fact, as far as I can recall, all three volumes of this series have been less than stellar, with none making my 50% or more enjoyable stories test to keep...

Much better was the reprint of Wild Cards with the two new stories added, edited by George R.R. Martin and Dark & Stormy Knights, another urban fantasy anthology, edited by P.N. Elrod. The "Wild Cards" series has long been a favorite, so two new stories was just icing on replacing my worn-down original copy of volume one. And Elrod's anthologies have a high ratio of quality...

I love Baen's offering of election Advance Reader Copies. I mean fifteen bucks is normally about twice my max for an e-book. But I can't resist getting things like the newest "Ring of Fire" novel, 1636: Papal States by Eric Flint & Charles Gannon three months early. This one finishes up the Italy centric arc started previous by Flint & Andrew Dennis...

Got Check Wendig's Dinocalypse Now as part of a Kickstarter drive. Its a fun pulp-adventure story that serves as an introduction to "Spirit of the Century" rpg. The book is full of psychic dinosaurs, jet pack adventurers, talking gorillas and angry cavemen with a cliff-hanger ending...

No Wake Zone is the sequel to C.E. Grundler's Last Exit to New Jersey. You'd think Hazel Moran's friends and family would have figured out that lieing to her for her own good doesn't work. I mean it went really badly the last time...

The roommate got into writers Ilona Andrews from one of their short stories. And I can't blame him since I devoured thru the first five of their "Kate Daniels" books, Magic Bites, Magic Burns, Magic Strikes, Magic Bleeds and Magic Slays over several days. The series is set in a world where technology is failing as magic rises into ascendcy. Kate Daniels, the lead, is a merc and troubleshooter dealing with shapeshifters, vampires and guilds of would be paladins in a altered Atlanta...

In fact I liked them enough to grab up the various short stories and novellas for my Kindle. Magic Dreams and Magic Mourns are regular expand the setting style shorts. Curran and Fathers & Sons retell portions of the previous volumes from the view point of the main romantic interest for Kate...

Also from the Andrews, but unrelated to "Kate Daniels", was the novella Of Swine & Roses, a story about feuding magical Houses, teen romance and a pig related curse...

I'm still not sure about the Long Earth by Terry Pratchett & Stephen Baxter. Its a good book and I am intrigued enough to want to know what happens next. But something about most Multiple Earth stories just doesn't click with me. I'm not sure why, maybe its something to do with Quantum...

Charles DeLint's Little Grrl Lost is nice YA book which puts a would be punk Little into his Newford setting...

Got to several of my backlog of Kindle Deal of the Day books in July. Starting with Heat Wave by Richard Castle. A decent enough modern mystery/crime book, where I'd be interested in checking out the rest of the series if I find them on the cheap. I do wonder who they have ghost writing them...

Also tv related is the Cold Dish by Craig Johnson, the first in the "Longmire" series the recent A&E show was adapted from. I'm definitely wanting to check out the rest of this series, but $12.99 is well above my normal price limit on an eBook. And I couldn't remember the author's damn name the last time I was at the used book store. Also Lou Diamond Philips captured his character's voice perfectly in the tv show...

I was a bit let down by the other two Deal books. Alison Croggon's the Naming is a pseudo-Gaelic/Celtic fantasy that reminded my a bit of Lloyd Alexander. But man, the book just slogged along at times. Its the first in what is obviously meant to be an epic story, but I can't find myself willing to wade thru the next books. The other book, Zane Grey's Riders of the Purple Sage just failed to connect with me. I found myself giving up about 3/4 of the way thru. The book wasn't helped by the guest introduction basically spoiling the ending in discussing the story...

The Drowned Cities by Paolo Bacigalupi is in the same world as his Ship Breaker, where much of the south-eastern U.S. is devastated marshland. I like the touch, where China attempted a peace keeping mission against the many American warlords...

Mira Grant's Blackout brings her "Newsflesh" trilogy to a close. And its a pretty fucking bad-ass ending, what with the giant conspiracy and the surprise resurrection and all...

From the roommate insists I read this pile, Eric Flint & Dave Freer's Slow Train to Acturus has an alien civilization making first contact with a Terran Generation-type colony ship. Pretty good and interesting directions the various human cultures evolved in. Larry Niven & Jerry Pournelle the Mote in God's Eye was a scifi classic I'd never got to. And I own a few of the pair's other books. But I found myself having to constantly remind myself that they wrote this in the 70s to try and get past how antiquated the futuristic culture seemed. Especially given the one non-white character being a underhanded, conniving baddie...

Peter Clines' Ex-Heroes and Ex-Patriots are an enjoyable pair of super-heroes in zombie apocalypse world. I'm hopeful that Clines will put out a third book in the series...

And finally Kitty Steals the Show is Carrie Vaughn's most recent "Kitty Norville" book. With werewolf radio host Kitty going to London and the First International Conference on Paranatural Studies. With Kitty and her family meeting up with various old friends and foes, looking into the vampire's Long Game and helping a ghost have a family reunion...

Total Books: 28

Stake Land

Mar. 26th, 2012 07:26 pm
lurkerwithout: (eastman)
A zombie movie, except they drink blood instead of eating flesh or brains and so are called vampires. But really its zombies. The movie follows an orphaned teen boy and the survivalist who rescues him as they journey across the post-apocalypse country in search of a near mythical town called New Eden. A better than average zombie Earth flick, though it does have an annoying Rule Change pop up in the third act...
lurkerwithout: (iRead)
So the totals for last year; Jan: 20 + Feb: 19 + Mar: 24 + Apr: 53 + May: 20 + Jun: 15 + Jul: 28 + Aug: 23 + Sep: 28 + Oct: 21 + Nov: 20 + Dec: 23 = Total: 294

Previous Year Past Totals -
'06: 246
'07: 211
'08: 247
'09: 296
'10: 272

That big total for April was due to spending a week or so at work just rereading the 30+ odd Grantville Gazette e-books. Other than that this year I gave up on Simon R. Green and L.E. Modesitt Jr. And I really got into Carrie Vaughn's "Kitty" and David Weber's "Honor Harrington" series. Oh and I tried to read War & Peace. But, godsdamn, the characters in that were annoying twits. Managed only about 15% of it before giving up...

Oh and thanks to the roommate started in on Mira Grant's zombie + bloggers series "Newsflesh". Which led into this year reading the modern fae series she writes under Seanan McGuire. Best part of having a roommate who reads as much as me really, is saving money and still getting new books...
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
Opened the month up with Discord's Apple by Carrie Vaughn, a mix of near future fall of civilization and ancient myth. And while I enjoyed Vaughn's modern paranormal werewolf call-in radio show host series, this one just didn't work for me. I don't know if it was the set up or the asshole Greek gods, but I just didn't care for it...

I was much more pleased with the second Vaughn book I read in the month, After the Golden Age, a supers book about the non-powered daughter of a super-hero couple. Not a perfect book, but enjoyable...

Got the final Beka Cooper book by Tamora Pierce, Mastiff early in the month as well. A bit more morose in tone than the previous ones, but overall a fine ending to the trilogy with Beka and her law dog partners being brought in to track down a kidnapped prince by a very ruthless and arrogant cabal...

After that I ended up buying a whole mess more of David Weber's "Honor Harrington" series. Flag in Exile, Honor Among Enemies, In Enemy Hands, Echoes of Honor, Ashes of Victory and War of Honor. So books five thru nine in series. I do enjoy Weber, but he's got a some noticeable writing tics. As I mentioned last month, he's got a tendency to do huge info-dumps of expository dialogue or just description. Which I'll admit on a few occasions led to some "don't care, don't care skim skim skim" during bits of world building or tech description. Especially the later. Really I'm more space opera than hard scifi so I don't really care most of the time how the widget works. I'm fine with a bit of Trek techno-babble to hand wave things. Still, I don't doubt there are plenty out there who love getting the details. And another quirk of Weber's is related to that. He can give a seemingly unneeded amount of back-story to minor characters. Many of whom end up very, very dead within pages. Still, I'm within a couple books of being caught up on the main series and I'm tracking down both various side-books, collaborations and anthologies AND dipping into some of his other series so its not like its a huge turn off for me...

And while skimming thru Baen's e-book selection (specifically the free section) I came across the Baen 2011 Free Short Story anthology. A nice collection, including two scifi writers I hadn't heard of before, Sharon Lee & Steve Miller's "Liaden Universe" and Michael Z. Williamson's "Freehold", whose stories intrigued me enough that I'll be checking them out in more detail at some point...

Sadly the same isn't true of Dani & Eyton Kollin's the Unincorporated Man. Borrowed that one from the roommate's collection and its story about a future where every person in a publicly trade corporation and what happens to that society when an unincorporated cryogenic revival is dropped into it didn't work for me. Which means I'll be giving the other two books in the series a pass...

Happily though, my next book was a new "Shadows of the Apt" book by Adrian Tchaikovsky. Heirs of the Blade follows several of the characters in the Dragonfly Commonweal lands. Very enjoyable, though a bit of a bridging book setting things up for the renewal of the threat of the Wasp Empire...

Also got a new Grantville Gazette in November, the 38th. Which reminds me, I really need to get around to transferring all the Baen e-books I bought that month to my computer so I can transfer them to my Kindle...

The roommate also pushed Jim Butcher's Spider-Man novel, the Darkest Hours, on me and I was more than pleasantly surprised by it. Its set sometime during the J.M.S. run on the comic but before Spidey joins up with the Avengers. Though his use of both M.J. and the marriage, as well as a partial face turn by the Rhino, makes me even more annoyed with "One More Day" and parts of "The Gauntlet" all over again. But for Spider-Man fans who have avoiding the comics out of disgust, this is an excellent way to get a Spidey fix...

Finally got around to picking up a copy of the Lois McMaster Bujold novel, Falling Free. Which is an early book by her that serves as something of a prequel to the Vorkosigan books. A bit rough in spots, but nice...

Got the second of Larry Correia's "Grimnoir" series, Spellbound. Which are about magically powered super-humans in the 1920s. Very pulpy and fun, though Correia is a bit of a gun fetishest. Not as much here as in his "Monster Hunter" series, but there is still some of it...

Also on the always meant to get around to reading list is Jane Lindskold's Brother to Dragons, Companion to Owls. If only because I love that title. Which made me think this would be a fantasy book. But its actually a dystopian near future one with a bit of psychic powers thrown into the mix...

Then it was Mira Grant's second zombies vs. bloggers "Newsflesh" books, Deadline. Which follows up on the conspiracy exposed in Feed and takes things to a whole new level of Oh Fuck Me. I'm pretty sparing with getting into zombie stuff, because it honestly gives me screwed up dreams, but Grant is a definite keeper...

And then I finished up the month with an early fantasy book by Patricia Briggs, Masque and the sequel to it she wrote much later, Wolfesbane. Even with some re-editing for a new release the first book is very much a first novel. Not a bad book about mercenary/spy/mage girl versus the Giant Evil Wizard, but definitely full of some well-used fantasy tropes and rough first-book-out-of-college edges...

Total books: 20
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
October ended up having a larger than average number of books I just didn't care for. And for most it wasn't even that they were bad as that they didn't click with me. Like Colin Harvey's Winter Song about a barely habitable arctic colony world and it vaguely Norse-ish inhabitants. Or Kevin Anderson & Doug Benson's Ill Wind which looks at a bio-engineered plague that ends up eating everything made from fossil fuels. Or Anthony Neil Smith's Yellow Medicine, a pulpy book about a crooked cop who ends up the frozen backwoods of Minnesota after getting caught being a crooked cop in Missouri. Actually this one with its collection of psycho gangsters and possibly terrorists begins to edge into being a bad book more than a bad fit...

Also on the free classics front, H.G. Wells' The Island of Dr. Moreau just didn't do anything for me. I still like the concept of Dr. Moreau and his island of beast/men, but the book itself? Enh. And as for Robert Louis Stephenson's Kidnapped? All I can say is the young lead in this one is no Jim Hawkins...

And normally I like Tanya Huff, but her short story collection Nights of the Round Table just has two stories that left me totally cold. Both dealing with Evil Overlord/Queens who are hyper-competent and somehow unbeatable and thus really, really boring...

But really the only one for the month that I'd classify as genuinely bad was Duane Swierczynski's Fun and Games. Which has simply ludicrous premise. That the ruling elite of Hollywood has some kind of death squad made up of wannabe actors, directors and writes who can get to anybody and make it look like an accident. So stupid...

Anyway, over to the stuff I actually enjoyed for October. Starting with a Vorksogian novella by Lois M. Bujold, Winterfair Gifts. A story from the perspective of one of Miles' armsmen during his wedding, that takes place between A Civil Campaign and Diplomatic Immunity...

Then some Bernard Cornwell, with an American Revolution military history fiction, The Fort. And if Cornwell is at all accurate, then man Paul Revere was a giant tool...

October also saw me getting another of friend Joe Selby's books to beta read. This time a Young Adult book in a pseudo-Middle Eastern fantasy setting called Prince of Cats. Needed a little tweaking, but another one from him that I can hopefully one day pick up a published copy of...

From the borrowed from the roommate's shelf list we start with Mira Grant's Feed. Which is a near future zombie Earth book. With the title being a reference to the zombies and to the protagonist's jobs as bloggers who join the press corps of a presidential candidate. Grant really impresses, not just for her skills at dialogue and story. But in how well thought out her world building is, especially in the "science" of her setting's undead plague...

Then the new Lev Grossman, the Magician King, his follow up to the Magicians. This one actually manages to be even more bleak than the first, with its partial focus on the non-Wizard School magical community...

After that was the two latest Gaunt's Ghosts books by Dan Abnett, mostly because I got the roommate the most recent as a birthday gift. Blood Pact has Gaunt and his men slowly falling apart as they spend an extended period stationed way behind the lines. Until a potential turncoat and the Chaos forces sent to assassinate him prod them back into being bad-ass action soldiers again. Salvation's Reach. has the Ghosts taking part in a dangerous mission against a Chaos research station. Plus they're working with Space Marines. Warhammer 20K Imperial Space Marines a crazy hard-core...

Also got the newest Terry Pratchett, Snuff, last month. A new Sam Vimes sub-series book, with a focus on goblins, the Disc's lowest intelligent species. Some excellent scenes with Vimes and Willikins his butler and Vimes and the country gentry and Vimes and Young Sam learning about poop together. This one lacks a bit in the Big Bad department, but the always wonderful characters makes up for that small lack...

Reread the first two Beka Cooper books by Tamora Pierce, Terrier and Bloodhound again. In expectation of getting the final book in the trilogy towards the end of the month. And then my copy got delayed from Amazon, so I didn't get to it until November. Oh well, still some of my favorites...

I finished up the month starting on David Weber's "Honor Harrington" scifi space opera/military series. In part because Baen has the first two, On Basilisk Station and the Honor of the Queen available as free e-books, with the rest at $5 each. So after Honor's first two stories ended the month with A Short & Victorious War and Field of Dishonor. Good military space battle stuff, with technology premises that make them similar to wooden ship and cannon type stuff. And the politics of Kingdom of Manticore remind me a lot of Elizabeth Moon's "Familas Regnant" series. In a good way. The only slightly annoying quirk I found was Weber uses a lot of info-dump exposition to world build. Where a character will go to use something or think about something, which then turns into a big expository thing. Not the worst way to drop world build info, but it was noticeable...

Total books: 21
lurkerwithout: (Reading cat)
My shop got shorted on the new Casanova - Avaritia sadly. But they said they'd make sure to pull me one when it comes in later in the week so thats ok then. Did get one of the nuDC books, Static Shock. It has Virgil living in New York instead of Dakota. And being remotely mentored by Hardware which is cool. He also has two sisters and both parents which is definitely a change from the animated show. And I think one from the Milestone series. Its being written by Scott McDaniel, who I can't recall from anything else and John Rozum, whose excellent Xombi relaunch ended just last week...

iZombie continues on with Gwen's secret monsterism being exposed to her monster-hunter boyfriend. Plus the whole town under attack from brainless zombies. Another issue with damn near every character getting at least a little face time...

Over to Marvel, the Thunderbolts escapees find themselves somehow having traveled back in time. To WW2. Where they end up teamed with Captain America and Namor fighint Nazis. And I must say there are few things finer then seeing Namor shouting Imperius Rex while smashing Nazis...

Over on Heroes for Hire I still hate Kyle Hotz' art. But I love how Elektra explains her ability to sucker the Purple Man into thinking she was mind-controlled. "I'm a ninja". Like duh man...

Profile

lurkerwithout: (Default)
lurkerwithout

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
23 45678
9 101112 13 1415
16 17 1819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 21st, 2017 06:51 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios