lurkerwithout: (Bag cat)
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
April
Short Fiction: Marie Brennan's "From the Editorial Page of the Falchester Weekly Review", Glenn Hirshberg's "Freedom is Space for the Spirit", Tara Isabella Burton's "the Destroyer" & Genevieve Valentine's "La Beaute Sans Vertu".

New Reads:
Brandon Sanderson's Calamity and the Bands of Mourning.  The first finishes up his supers' trilogy and the latter is part of his steampunk-era "Mistborn" series.
Steven James' Blur.  An ok YA paranormal mystery.
Daniel Jose Older's Midnight TaxiTango.  2nd novel of his "Bone Street Rumbo" series.
Tim Dorsey's Florida Roadkill.  First foray into Dorsey's  modern crime/pulp stuff.  A bit too wide a spread of characters and plots for me.
Adrian Tchaivosky's Guns of the Dawn.  A black powder-fantasy book where one of the two warring nations begins conscripting female soldiers to shore up its manpower shortages.  Feels a little like of an Austen character was the lead in a Bernard Cornwell Napoleonic book.
Elizabeth Bear/Sarah Monette's a Companion to Wolves.  Monette is the writer of the Goblin Emperor under a pseudonym and Elizabeth Bear is Elizabeth Bear.  So this is very well written.  It also has a LOT of really graphic gay sex, much that borders on the edge of non-consensual.
Daniel Abraham's the Spider's War.  The final to "the Dagger & the Coin" epic fantasy series which features the heroism of the banking system and using it to fight mad, religious tyrants.
Seanan McGuire's Indexing: Reflections.
Charlie Higson's the Enemy
Sherwood Smith's Remnala's Children.  Some follow-up stories to the Crown/Court Duel books.
Michael Shea's the Extra.  Future dystopia where filmmakers can literally kill off their extras in movies.
Emmie Mears' the Masked Songbird.  First of Mears' "Shrike" supers series.

Rereads:
Eric Flint/George Huff/Paula Goodlett's 1636: the Kremlin Games, 1636: the Barbie Consortium & 1636: the Viennese Waltz
Iver Cooper's 1636: Seas of Fortune
Lois McMaster Bujold's Captain Vorpatril's Alliance & Gentelman Jole & the Red Queen

Graphic Novels/TPBs/Rulebooks:  I'm moving rpgs and other non-fiction here since I don't really go thru enough of it for its own category.
Faith Erin Hicks's the Nameless City.  Alt history in a pseduo-China/Mongolia border setting.
Ultimate Intrigue (Pathfinder).  I liked this sourcebook quite a bit.  The roommate fell in love with the evil version of the Leadership feat and other new rules for his wizard/rogue crime boss.

Total books: 22


May
Short Fiction: Theodora Goss' "Red as Blood and White as Bone", Emmie Mears' "Uncaged", Brit Mandelo's "the Pigeon Summer", P. Djeli Clark's "a Dead Djinn in Cairo", K.B. Spangler's "Who Tells Your Story", Dennis Danvers' "Orphan Pirates of the Spanish Main" and Seanan McGuire's "Waking in Las Vegas".

New Reads:
Sharon Lee/Steve Miller's Alliance of Equals.  Their most recent "Liaden" novel.  Actually an eARC for the most recent.
Elizabeth Bear's Karen Memory.  Steampunk/Western with a bisexual female prostitute as the lead.
Emmie Mears' Rampant.  2nd "Shrike" novel which are set in Edinburgh.
Kameron Hurley's Mirror Empire.  Super-grim and violent fantasy series about parallel worlds and invasions between them.
Marko Kloos' Chain of Command
R.J. Ross' Cape High Christmas
Kate Elliot's Jaran, An Earthly Crown, His Conquering Sword & the Law of Becoming.  Both a pseudo-Mongolion horde "fantasy" and a Conquered Humanity sci fi series.
Alex Shvartsman (ed) Funny Fantasy.  What it says on the box.  A collection of previously published comedy fantasy stories.
Nick Mamatas/Masumi Washington (ed) Hanzai Japan.  Japan-set scifi, much with a noir or horror slant to it.
Amy Poehler's Yes Please.  Poehler's autobio.

Rereads:
Andre Norton's Gryphon in Glory.  While this was a reread, I honestly couldn't remember anything at all going in.
Tamora Pierce's Protector of the Small

Graphic Novels/TPBs/Rulebooks:
XCrawl (d20).  Picked up on the cheap with a stack of other rpgs from Bookmans.  Competitive reality show dungeon crawling works better in concept than the actual execution.
Mike Maihack's Cleopatra in Space vol. 3: Secret of the Time Tablets.  Caps off the trilogy with a reveal of the origin of the big bad and some idea of why Cleopatra of all historical figures.
Scott Snyder/Jock's Wytches.  This was honestly one of the more disturbing horror comics I've read in awhile.
John Layman/Rob Guillory's Chew vol.11: the Last Suppers & Chew vol. 10: Blood Puddin'.  I actually ordered and read vol. 11 and then realized I'd skipped the 10th volume.
Krazy Krow/Rocio Zuchhi's Spinnarette: Crisis in a Bunch of Ohios.  Latest print collection of the supers/humor webcomic.
Kiyohiko Azuma's Yotsuba&! vol.13.  We get to meet Yotsuba's grandmother.

Total: 24


June:
Short Fiction: Harry Turtledove's "Typecasting", A.J. Hartley's "Chains" and Monica Byrne's "Traumphysik".

New Reads:
Cat Valente's Speakeasy.  Roaring 20s plus Faires with Valente lyrical-style.
Maggie Stiefvater's Shiver.  Paranatural-YA with external temparture triggered werewolves.
Ian Thomas Healy's Tusks & the Lion & the Five Deadly Serpents.  "Inception" style dream adventure and 70's era kung fu in Healy's "Just Cause" supers setting.
Naomi Novak's League of Dragons.  The finale for the "Tremaire" series.
Jim Hines' Revisionary.  And another finale, this time for the "Libriomancer" series.
Drew Hayes' Corpies.  I like Hayes' supers books, but they all feel like they could use another editorial pass once they're collected together from his original free chapters online source.
Jennifer Henshaw/Allison Lin (ed) Future Visions: Original Science Fiction Inspired by Microsoft.  There are some really good scifi stories in this collection.  No really.
Ryan North's Romeo and/or Juliet.  I do like that several of the ending options involved the teens just talking to their parents and avoiding a whole lot of deaths.
Andre Norton Cat'seye. Human/animal psychic partnerships.  Different from the "Beastmaster" ones.
Chuck Wendig's Atlanta Burns.  Kind of white-trash "Veronica Mars".  Or maybe Really Angry and VIolent "Nancy Drew".

Reread:
Terry Pratchett's Wee Free Men, a Hat Full of Sky, Wintersmith, I Shall Midnight & Shepard's Crown.  Shut up, I'm not crying.  You're crying.

Graphic Novels/TPBs/Rulebooks:
the Dresden Files RPG: Your Story (FATE)
Evan Dahm's Vattu: the Sword & the Sacrament
C. Spike Trotman (ed) New World: An Anthology of Sci-Fi and Fantasy
Jim Zub/Steve Cummings' Wayward vol. 3
Tony Cliff's Delilah Dirk & the King's Shilling.  To England!

Total: 22
lurkerwithout: (Mal's pretty hat  Angie creator)
After various delays our group managed to get together for a game session.  With me running a short-term Paranoia campaign before getting back to Pathfinder.  I was a little worried that with only the roommate out of the five players being familiar with the game, the dark humor and light rules knowledge wouldn't go over and even had a back-up game.  But the all jumped right into the silly names, the intentionally working at cross-purposes and secretiveness.  All five of them managed to get a use for their mutant power without getting caught.  One player died five times and had his last clone exiled.  And only one player managed to avoid death thanks to being able to survive a drunk driving crash.  AND they even managed to complete their primary mission and secondary mission thanks to the creative use of an ancient Furby.  Plus bonus for me, the nefarious Bo-Y-RDE remains as their current suprevisor...
lurkerwithout: (Shiny)
lurkerwithout: (Shiny)
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
More late than usual on this one.  So let us start with the free-range short fiction for August.  We've got "Cayos in the Stream" by Harry Turtledove.  A somewhat alternate history story with Hemingway hunting for Nazi U-boats in the Caribbean.  Then Meghan McCarron's "Swift, Brute Retaliation" where just being dead doesn't stop a dead kid from being a bullying dick to his little sisters.  V.E. Sawhab's "Warm Up" probably works better as a prequel chapter to her supers novel then as a stand-alone story.  And finally a Narbonic/Skin Horse short from Shaenon Garrity, "By Comitee", where a group of well-meaning activists (including an A.I, a gerbil and a cat) try to plan a surprise birthday party for a helicopter.  A black ops social services helicopter.  I do so love the Narboni-verse...

Carrying over from the previous month is the remaining of David Weber's "Safehold" books, How Firm a Foundation and  Midst Toil & Tribulation.  And I'm still very impatiently awaiting the next book due out next year...

Then we've got Neil Gaiman's the Ocean at the End of the Lane.  An excellent story about childhood terror and wonder and magic.  So like a lot of Gaiman's stuff...

Greg Stolze's Sinner is a supers book.  I think the roommate got this from a Kickstarter campaign.  I liked the world-building bits and the life and crimes of the titular super-villain, told after he turns himself in.  The final climax feels a bit rushed and I'm not sure how well it really holds together.  But Cephalopod, the remotely operated octopus themed super-hero was pretty damn cool...

Unfettered (edited by Shawn Speakman) was a pretty good anthology from a diverse bunch of writers, all to help with the editor's fight against cancer.  Or at least to help defray some of the costs of said fight...

Christopher Moore ruins art forever with Sacre Bleu.  Ok, thats his hyperbole.  But it definitely puts a similar twist on art to what he did with Jesus and vampires.  And King Lear.  And Christmas angels...

Helen and Troy's Epic Road Quest by A. Lee Martinez shows that working fast food can really suck and lead to being geased and having to work for cryptic agencies who are lot less helpful than they could be.  Also that its hard balancing being a modern Orc with the urge to follow your ancestral traditions...

Probably the most memorable scene in Illona Andrews' Magic Rises is while on a boat ride to Europe, the band of American shapeshifters (plus Kate) have to fight a band of weredolphin pirates.  Greek weredolphin pirates...

The Russians Are Coming is another story filling in the time gap for K.B. Spengler's <a href = "http://agirlandherfed.com/">A Girl & Her Fed</a>.  With squirrel infestations to go along with sort-of-government cyborgs.  And super-hardcore sex.  Lots of that...

Chuck Wendig's Blue Blazes is basically a urban fantasy story.  But more a criminal syndicates type story.  But also still that elder horror from beneath the earth.  But also a broken family drama.  Plus monsters and magic drugs...

Warbound finishes up Larry Correia's "Grimnoir" trilogy with the neccesary super-sized action sequences and heroic deaths.  All very epic pulp adventure...

Charlie Huston's latest, Skinner, is a near future epsionage technothriller.  With the titular Skinner being the world's scariest bodyguard...

Naomi Novik's most recent "Temeraire" book, Blood of Tyrants, takes her band of dragons and pilots from Japan to China and then to Napolean's invasion of Russia...

Next is Jim Hines' second Libriomancer book Codex Born.  This volume concentrates more on bad-ass dryad Lena Greenwood, in addition to Libriomancer Isaac...

After that was a quick reread of Steven Gould's Helm.  Don't remember what prompted it, beyond the book being one of my favorites...

Then one of Neal Asher's "Polity" books, Line of the Polity.  Worth it for making me wonder what the D&D or GURPS stats would be for a Gabbleduck.  No one does crazy space monsters like Neal Asher...

And finally Austin Grossman's YOU.  Which reminded me a whole lot of Douglas Coupland's Microserfs, in a very good way...

Total Books: 18
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
I really, really need to get these done earlier in the month. Luckily, I suppose, April is a pretty short list. Starting the Uncollected Short Stories. "Backscatter" by Gregory Benford is a cleverer than most scifi bit about asteroid mining and finding life in unexpected places. Karen Tidbeck's "Sing" is an odd piece about alien life and life choices. "Last Son of Tomorrow" by Greg Van Eekhout is a well written if not all that original look at the Superman archetype. And Prudence Shen's "Do Not Touch" is a nifty little modern fantasy about paintings with bonus Faith Erin Hick's illustration. The short story editor at Tor.com really does an excellent job...

For full length books we start with A Kiss Before Dying, Ira Levin's noir classic about a con artist and murderer. Who I know I'm not actually supposed to like, but man did I not like him...

Finished the second of the free Jay Lake books I won from Tor with Kalimpura. A good book, though I'm a bit annoyed to find that the contest gave me books one and three from a trilogy. But only a little, 'cause free books that were also good...

Digital Divide by K.B. Spangler is the first of several books set in the gap of several years between the first and second parts of her webcomic, A Girl and Her Fed. Really loved this and totally looking forward to the rest of the series...

Emma Bull's Finder is a tie-in to the "Bordertown" series. Sad ending, but in a moving way. I'm not sure if she did any more with the characters, but I might check out her husband's "Bordertown" tie-in books. Even if he is all crazy-pants...

Charles Stross' latest "Laundry Files" novel, the Apocalypse Codex is more of that perfect blend of cosmic horror, dry British wit and espionage...

I've had a copy of Nancy Kress' Beggars in Spain sitting on my Kindle for a good while now. Its not alone in that as my eBook version of To Be Read pile has gotten huge. But hers is definitely one I wish I'd read earlier because of how damn good it is...

Damage Time by Colin Harvey actually is kind of terrifying in its use of the cyberpunk trope of memory chips as a type of crime...

Finished the last Mathew Hughes' "Hell and Back" trilogy with Hell to Pay. Still not sure if I actually like the ending. Kind of feels like the author may of dropped the ball right at the goal line...

Right near the end of the month got the May edition of the eBook version for the Grantville Gazette, still edited by Paula Goodlett. This is the 47th in the series and while I enjoyed the new short fiction I wish I had a better way to sort them on my e-reader for when I want to re-read specific writers or stories...

And finally, ended the month with Paul Cornell's Falling London. Which is both a creepy urban fantasy and a British police procedural. Both done really well...

Total books: 11
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
I always expect to read a lot more on my birthday vacation, and yet I don't.  *shrug*

Started out the month with another of Mike Shephard's "Kris Longknife" books, Intrepid.  Later on I finished the remaining three, Undaunted, Redoubtable and Daring.  Sadly by book nine I had grown weary of Kris, her band of snarky sidekicks and the yo-yoing level of "science" available...

Got the latest "Liaden" book from Sharon Lee and Steven Miller, Necessity's Child.  This entry mostly pushes the regular character's into the background while focusing on one of the younger House Korval members.  As well as a far future version of what seems to be Roma...

During the vacation I did get to the stack of "Walt Longmire" by Craig Johnson books the roommate got me at Christmas.  I read the 1st one a  while back after getting an e-version on sale, so this was the next three.  The books, Kindness Goes Unpunished, Another Man's Moccasins, and Death Without Company, are a step above the tv adaptation (which isn't too shabby on its own) though Henry Standing Bear's voice is very much that of Lou Diamond Phillips during the reading...

I'd had Isaac Marion's zomromcom Warm Bodies for awhile, but I didn't really get inspired to finish it off until catching the movie version.  The zombies in the book have more of a weird culture than the movies.  With the skeletal skinless zombies being a kind of priest/teacher caste.  Plus the zombies eat people a bit longer than they do in the movie...

Jasper Fforde starts up yet another series with the Last Dragonslayer.  Though this modern fantasy is aimed at a YA audience.  And could work as a one-off.  But I wouldn't seeing more of his wizardry run by bureaucracy again...

Also finally got to the next two books of Alan Dean Foster's "Tipping Point" cyberpunk trilogy.  While the final bad reveal was a bit of a let-down, it was more than made up for by watching the super-assassin chasing the heroes get an ass-kicking from a giant ground sloth in the second book, Body, Inc.  And the deadly engineered family of meerkats in the Sum of Her Parts...

Peter Brett's latest "Demon Cycle" book, the Daylight War, dropped in February as well.  Which in addition large sections devoted to one character's back-story (which served to make them a great deal more sympathetic) has the confrontation between the Warded Man and the Spear of the Desert...

After sitting thru much of the recent movie version, decided to get around to Jules Verne's Mysterious Island.  Which needed more giant animals.  And I kind of felt the survivor group went from almost zero resources to being able to make flintlock weapons a bit too easily...

I mostly picked up the Myth Interpretations collection by the late Robert Asprin to get a copy of his "Cold Cash War".  Though it also has some amusing Skeeve and company stories...

And finally was a new-ish Steve Hamiltion "Alex McKnight" book, Misery Bay.  With Alex agreeing to look into the suicide of U.S. Marshall's son.  Which leads to a revenge-based cinema verte killer...

Total Books: 16
lurkerwithout: (Book on bed)
I should really get these done sooner, I've been seriously slacking on them. And April was a pretty light month with the books read. Started with an urban fantasy series involving tooth fairies by Jennifer Safrey called Tooth & Nail. Don't remember a lot about this, beyond that the main character was an amateur female boxer, the fae were kinda callous jerks and the bad guy master plan involved mind altered kids. Also that I didn't care for it even a little...

After that I went with the second of Tobias Buckell's "Xenowealth" series, Ragamuffin. It takes awhile before the new characters meet up with the original cast, but it gives some excellent world building in its on-the-run tour of parts of the Benevolent Satrapy, where humanity are 3rd class citizens at best. Also some excellent zero-g gunfight sequences...

Next up is the second of Phil & Kaja Foglio's text versions of Girl Genius, Agatha & the Clockwork Princess. Like the previous novel, the Foglios do a great job of adapting formats, losing nothing from the original and adding just a small amount of extra info to increase the value of the book. The book covers volumes Four thru Six of the comic. And I'm hopeful that the next volume will be able to cover Agatha and Castle Hetrodyne in less time...

And then still another second volume, with Dan Well's Mr. Monster. I've been hesitant to finish up this trilogy, since much of whats going on the head of the budding sociopath teen protagonist disturbed me. Plus it involved violence against a cat which is just one of my buttons. The roommate assures me the mental state of John Cleaver improves a bit in the finale, so I'll probably get around to it fairly soon. After all I've still got some curiosity about how this whole Dexter + Buffy concept works out...

I then tried another book by Chris Roberson, End of the Century. It makes a somewhat novel take on the Arthurian mythos and has an interesting interconnected three-time period story. But something about how the ending shows that it was mostly a way to interlock several of Roberson's previous stories and characters that left me feeling fairly ambivalent about it...

Happily getting Jenny "the Bloggess" Lawson's Let's Pretend This Never Happened was a much more positive reading experience. Lawson's website is often one of the funniest things I'll read and her first book collection didn't disappoint...

Read the first of Alan Dean Foster's "Tipping Point" cyberpunk books the Human Blend and enjoyed it quite a bit. I like the set-up where much of human society indulges in wildly varying body modifications...

The next two e-books are really more novellas or even short stories than full length books. But both are quite good. Stephen King's Mile 81 is creepy and weird and he manages to give real depth to characters you only get to spend a page or two with. And John Scalzi's Election about a human running for city council seat that hasn't had a human win it in decades is just funny and clever in all the best ways...

After that I finally got around to finishing up Sherwood Smith's "Wren" series with Wren's Quest, Wren's War and Wren Journymage, a YA fantasy series focused on a teen princess and her wizard in training best friend...

Blake Crouch's Run was a very nasty piece of survival horror. The set-up is that a large portion of America's population seemingly goes crazy overnight and becomes a merciless army dedicated to wiping out the rest of the population. Regardless of what their previous relationships might have been. The struggle by the point of view family to survive both the kill-crazy mobs and nature was pretty brutal...

Next was a reread of the George R.R. Martin edited Fort Freak. I'd already read the latest Wild Card anthology, but I ordered my own copy when it hit mass-market paperback. And after that was another anthology with the May 41st edition of the Grantville Gazette (edited still by Flint and Goodlet) coming out a couple days early...

And I finished out the month with Dead is the New Black by Marlene Perez. An ok teen girl urban fantasy and start to a series that I picked up as a Daily Deal at some point. The urban fantasy bits seemed a bit hastily added into the teen girl mystery base concept. Still, an ok read but not something where I see myself tracking down the further books in the series...

Total Books: 16

Yeah a very light month. And thats with almost too short to count Mile 81 and Election added in...

Parenting!

Feb. 4th, 2012 08:34 am
lurkerwithout: (Blue Rajah)
Director Max "Son of John Landis" Landis explains the Death (and Return) of Superman:

Book Quote

Apr. 10th, 2011 09:10 pm
lurkerwithout: (iRead)

"I am a retired priest. Did you know that?"

John asked, "Are you one of those priests who can shoot lasers out of their eyes? Because that would be really helpful right now."
lurkerwithout: (Keeyoot keetom)
Photobucket
lurkerwithout: (Dook Dook)
lurkerwithout: (Cat Jedi)
This week we go with Avalon Hill's Tales From the Floating Vagabond. The concept is simple enough. Its just the cliche of "and your characters meet at the tavern" and takes it to the next level. The Floating Vagabond is a bar. Somewhere in space and time and stuff. With doors that can randomly open to anywhere with a bar. And so the clientele can be from anywhere and anywhen and be anywhat. Needless to say its meant as a humor game...

To create your bar patron/hero you start with 20 Attribute points to buy your starting stats. It costs 1 pt per up to an Attribute value of 6. Then it costs 2 per. And every Attribute has to have a value of at least 1. For TFtFV there is: Strength, Nimbleness, Aim, Smarts, Cool, Common Sense and Luck. For this character I'll be rebuilding The Great and Powerful Gurgle, Drunken Ex-Evil Wizard. So Str: 1, Nim: 2, Aim: 3, Smarts: 4, Cool: 2, Common Sense: 2, Luck: 6. After that are Oops! Points, essentially Hit Points. To figure out those you add Strength and Luck and divide by 2. So Gurgle has 3. Though I don't see anything about rounding up or down. So actually lets make that 4...

Next you buy your Schtick and Skills. Whats a Schtick you ask? Its like a minor super-power. For example the Roy Rogers Schtick makes you really good with shooting stuff (but not people). The Schwarznegger Effect Schtick lets you ignore damage. The Trenchcoat Schtick gives you a trenchcoat you can pull needed tools out of. And so on. So cherry picking the Schtick you want costs 500 and rolling randomly is 200. I'm going to say that I rolled randomly and it came up Bartender's Choice (the GM in TFtFV is called the Bartender, natch) and he wants to test out a home-brew Schtick. The Rodney Dangerfield Effect. With it you can summon a wild party with free booze and 80s rock anywhere, anytime. Though you can only use it once per adventure. It also has the minor effect that you never pass out, no matter how much you drink...

This leaves 1300 points for Skills. So first we'll buy Cast Spells at Expert for 1200 points. This gives (Smarts 4 x Cast Spells 3) 12 spell points for casting the various spells. And we'll spend the last 100 points to get a level in the Mix Drinks skill...

And lastly is money. For starting funds you pick the highest from your Smarts, Common Sense or Luck, add 4d10 and then multiply by a 100. So Gurgle's highest is Luck at 6, then I roll a 15 total on the 4d10. So thats 6 + 15 = 21 x100 = 2100 Bucks. Though given I see his starting equipment being a stained robe, a staff with a knob on the end and a hip flask of hooch he'll probably have plenty of that left over...
lurkerwithout: (Cat Jedi)
This week we return to high school. Anime high school. Full of aliens and mutants and super-science and clueless guys being chased by scary women...

I'll be making a Near Human alien, Prince Neko deGato VonKatze. 187th in line for the throne of of the world of H'lokiteah. Near Humans just have a few alien traits. In this case fuzzy cat ears and a tail. Next TFO characters have eight statistics; Smarts, Bod, Relationship With Parents, Luck, Driving, Looks, Cool and Bonk. That last one is essentially how much damage you can take before passing out. For each you roll 1d6, and then you can swap points around, provided nothing goes above six or below one...

Smarts: 6, Bod: 3, R.W.P: 5, Luck: 3, Driving: 6, Looks: 6, Cool: 3, Bonk: 5. I'll move a couple points from Smarts to Cool and one from Driving to Luck. Of course in TFO the gamemaster is encouraged to screw with characters with high stats...

Next up are Knacks. Essentially bonuses to add to a stat for certain situations. Each Knack is connected to a specific Statistic. Like Hot-Rodding might go to Driving or Cool. Or Hit With Mallet would link to Bod. To determine Knacks you roll another d6. Then you divide that between as many Knacks as you want, to a maximum of 3 points. So for Prince Neko I roll another 6. I'll give him the Knacks of Sad Eyes of Doom+2 to RWP, Super-Adorable Innocence+1 to Looks, Kitty Kat Kung-Fu+1 to Bod and Go Too Damn Fast+2 to Driving...

Now we have alien powers. For this I roll 1d6 again on three of the alien powers tables. A roll of 4 gets Super Speed, 1 gets Nothing and 4 gets Temporal Funk. So he moves faster than a Cheetah AND can freeze time for up to a minute...

In the home stretch are Traits, Allowance and Wheels, Goodies & Gadgets. Traits are three habits, ways of looking at things or tendancies that further define the character. For my Cat Boi Prince I go with Easily distracted by shiny objects, Sleepy (he'll always be napping) and Goes both ways. Of course in TFO the characters are ALWAYS interupted before going All The Way. Because its funnier. For allowance Prince Neko only gets $25 a week. Stupid stingy royal family. And he's got $150 saved up. You start with a free vehicle, so Prince Neko will have a space-going flying motorcycle. Because it matches his leather jacket and mirror shades...
lurkerwithout: (Bunny is love)
I still feel terrible. And tired. And dizzy whenever I stand up. But I also had some yummy Campbell's microwave soup with a biscuit. Mmmm. Biscuit. Plus I just found The Blogess and I'm litterally crying from laughing...

Tee Hee

Apr. 7th, 2009 01:58 am
lurkerwithout: (Trust Sharpe)
Some jokes stolen from Michael Terracino

What's a trumpet player's most effective form of birth control?
His personality.

What did the drummer get on his IQ test?
Drool.

How do you get two flute players to play in tune?
Shoot one.

How do you get a guitarist to stop playing?
Give him sheet music.

What do you call a musician who breaks up with his girlfriend?
Homeless.

How do you get a musician off your front porch?
Pay for the pizza.

A boy says to his father, "Dad, I want to grow up and be a musician!" The father replies, "I'm sorry, son, but you can't have it both ways."


Well I laughed any way...

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